[Timber Blog] Bank Holiday – Friend or Foe?

freeimage-2918185-webHow do youcp-new2 view the Bank Holidays? Are they a welcome relief from the relentless five day week, an opportunity to sneak in an extra lie-in and a much needed third day off? Or, as is often the case with the self employed, is it an enforced unpaid day off? Whilst we all love that extra day off, it can wreak havoc if you have planned in a specific time span for a job or if you haven’t budgeted ahead to only be paid for a four day week.

Whichever way you see it, unless you work in retail, it’s highly likely that you won’t be working on Bank Holiday Monday.  Instead, thoughts turn to how to fill the long weekend… Will we be blessed with good weather, can you even contemplate fun days out or even, dare we say it, camping?  The likelihood is rain.  We can say this with confidence, without even checking the latest update from the Met Office because, lets face it, it ALWAYS rains on a Bank Holiday!

freeimage-136296-webSo, what is the alternative plan of action?  Potentially, another weekend of DIY…

Before you commence, it’s perhaps an idea to consider the downside of this.  Over the past few weeks we have noticed quite heavily documented in the news, the requirement for householders to check their insurance cover prior to commencing projects to avoid stumping up thousands of pounds to fix DIY disasters.  You’re advised to check beforehand to ensure you know what’s covered, and be aware that if you tackle major work you’re not qualified for then you risk invalidating your home insurance policy.  Our research has led us to discover that last year Halifax Home Insurance recorded almost 40,000 accidental damage claims, many of which were DIY related such as spilling paint or drilling through pipes.  In total the insurer paid out almost £13 million for accidental freeimage-6063405-webdamage, with each claim costing an average of £323 to fix. The month of May alone saw over £1 million in accidental damage claims, partly due to botched bank holiday home improvement jobs.

If that hasn’t put you off then why not just consider projects that can be started AND finished within the same long weekend.  There’s nothing worse than commencing a project, with the enthusiasm that three days of no work brings, only to realise at the end of the third day that it’s likely your new project is going to eat up all of your free time for the coming weeks and weekends.  Smaller projects such as repainting a room, or painting over wallpaper can have a huge impact on the aesthetics of your interior without taking up too much time.  Getting rid of curtains and adding blinds to all of your windows is another reasonably quick fix to making a dramatic difference.

freeimage-5683138-webAlternatively, why not consider a task that can be completed indoors (perhaps in the garage or the shed…) but will have maximum impact when the weather does finally change and we get some sun?  Take some time out to review your garden furniture and bring it up to scratch in anticipation of the long summer days.  The standard plastic furniture responds really well to a good scrub, but wooden garden furniture can also be retired to its former glory.  Softwood garden furniture, such as pine or cedar, can be pressure treated to resist decay and mould. A wash now and again with soapy water to remove dirt should be all that’s needed to keep it in good condition.  Hardwood garden furniture, such as teak and iroko, contain natural oils that provide protection from weathering. To further protect and prolong the natural colour of hardwood, use a specially formulated sealing product recommended by the furniture’s manufacturer.

Whatever you decide to do, here at Forestrall Timber and Fencing Merchants we wish you an enjoyable Bank Holiday weekend.  We’ll be open through to 11am on Saturday, so if there are any materials you need for your projects then don’t hesitate to call us on 01474 444150 or e-mail us on sales@forestrall.co.uk

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