[Timber Blog] Focus On Fencing

cp-new2Fencing is a big deal for us.  We pride ourselves on being one of the premier suppliers of fencing in Kent and we work really hard to be able to meet our customers requirements, whether it’s for a certain type of fence panel, posts, postmix or accessories. We could wax lyrical about all the different types of fencing we offer but you only need to look at our ecommerce partner website, TimberClick, to see all of that! Today we thought we’d look at some of the issues that seem to frequently arise with fencing.  Questions that as a supplier we are frequently asked, albeit legal and planning regulations are not our speciality!  We have searched out the answers for our customers (although we would always recommend that you take the correct professional advice) and hope that by compiling them here we can assist anyone else with similar queries.

Fence panels, concrete posts and gravel boardsWho owns which fence?

There isn’t actually a rule that stipulates whether you own the fence on the left or the fence the right of your property.  The responsibility for the boundaries is set in place when the land is originally sold and so the conveyance deed (or the transfer deed) should identify which boundaries the purchaser is responsible for.

Sometimes you can work out who is responsible for a fence by establishing the pattern of fence ownership along the same side of the street.  It’s rare that you would find one plot that falls out of sync with the other houses.

AAAIAIDoesn’t the law state that the attractive side of the fence must face your neighbours?

No! This is often done as a courtesy to neighbours, however there is no law that states that the smooth side of the fence should face the neighbour.  When you are paying for a fence you are at liberty to choose the style and colour of the fence, and also whether you  position the smooth side of the fence to face in towards your garden or out towards your neighbours garden.

IMG_1603Can you push someone to mend / replace a rickety fence?

Unfortunately you can’t.  Boundaries don’t have to be fenced, so therefore you cannot force someone to either repair an old fence or erect a new fence. It is frustrating, particularly if you are a dog owner or have small children that you want to allow the freedom of your garden however all you can do is erect your own fence alongside your neighbour’s fence so that effectively there would be two fences, one on your land and one on your neighbour’s land.

Florence PanelWhat height can my fence reach?

We do always recommend to our customers to check with their local planning office on this one, as it can vary. Generally you will find that fences in rear gardens can be up to 2 metres high.  As long as you are within the height limit set by your local authority then your neighbours cannot insist on you either increasing or decreasing the height of your fence.

CreocoteWhat are the rules regarding my side of my neighbours fence?

If you have a long expanse of 6′ high fencing that borders your garden all the way round there is a temptation to forget that on one side the fencing does not actually belong to you! However you should proceed with caution because you MUST get your neighbours permission for anything that you want to do to the fence, which includes staining, painting or applying preservative to your side of the fence.  If you don’t have permission you can be reported for criminal damage.

We hope that this helps with your fencing questions.  We are available Monday to Saturday to help you with any other questions that may arise and can be reached on 01474 444150 or sales@forestrall.co.uk

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One Response to [Timber Blog] Focus On Fencing

  1. Pingback: Setting Clear Boundaries…. | Forestrall Timber and Fencing Merchants

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